HR Tech: Technology Vs Need = Chicken Vs Egg?

robotchicken

I MC’d several HR conferences recently, here and in Singapore. One of the reasons conferences occur is to pick up on trends and, certainly, technology features predominantly amongst trends. Phrases get thrown around like ‘big data’ and everyone goes “ooh” or “grr”. I’m a fan of irony and nothing tickles me more than a presenter on a technology topic who includes a link to an online video in their presentation and then expresses incredulous surprise when it either doesn’t connect at all, or streams erratically. They’re genuinely astonished that the conference venue doesn’t have broadband as good as their high tech headquarters where they tested everything. I so applaud their optimism but c’mon, download it, edit it and embed it. If you can’t get that right, what faith can we have in your product?

Many of these videos are from futurists and fans of the movie ‘Minority Report’. It’s like a drinking game at HR conferences – every time you see a scene in a presenter’s video where someone pinches or swipes the air in front of their face and a holographic ‘screen’ opens and floats there and they tap it or throw it to a wall, you have to skull your drink. Fortunately, at conferences it’s just water with way too much ice. This presents risks of its own but at least intoxication isn’t one of them.

Chickens and eggs, horses and carts – one of those represents the relationships between HR practices and HR technology. For example, one of the speakers quoted a prediction that, within a few years, professional firms will have on average a 50-50 blended workforce. So, half your people will not be employees but may be contractors or some variation on that theme. This floating, flexible, just-in-time talent pool may or may not be located on your premises. Is this trend occuring because mobile technology enables it or is mobile technology being developed to profit from the trend. I think it’s chickens and eggs.

Another process that’s not necessarily all about technology but technology is making it so much more do-able and everyone is increasingly familiar with it because of online activity is rating. The international speakers at the Singapore conference talked a lot about rating. One example was semi-formal ENPS (Employee Net Promoter Score) ‘pulse checks’ from employees using an app or an intranet link instead of, or in addition to, infrequent and more in-depth engagement surveys. Another example was online forums where people can rate their boss like they’d rate a book on Amazon or rate a restaurant on Yelp. Starting at a job might be more navigatable if you had as part of your orientation and induction an app called ‘Job Advisor’ akin to ‘Trip Advisor’. If you won’t stay at anything less than a four star hotel, why would you even contemplate working for anything less than a four star boss? (Five stars is the best. Unless it’s a planetarium, in which case five stars is terrible).

Needless to say, there were mixed feelings about such rating systems. That’s not to throw shade at the technology. The issues seemed to be more about how the ratings were conducted, privacy, and human nature.

Singapore was full of rating. The moment you legally entered the country through immigration, a tablet on a post was your first impression. Glowing pink and yellow, it offered a five point likert scale to assess the experience you just had with immigration. Five cartoon faces ranging from very smiley to very non smiley. Again, I admire the optimism but the person I was rating (and who had the authority to detain me for forty eight hours) was only one metre behind me! I gave them a pretty smiley but not very smile face and scurried on my way. The next such panel I encountered was on my way out of the toilet. The screen had the same likert scale of smiley faces but also had a photo of someone I assume was the person responsible for the state of the toilets. (Either that or employee of the month). It was actually a great toilet experience and I would have absolutely given them the highest rating but if there’s one touch screen I’m not touching, it’s there. Maybe if they had a foot operated survey? I feel the same way about the door handles and the taps.

The thing with technology is that it’s a tool. Someone makes it and hopes there’s a need or someone observes there is a need and creates a tool to solve a problem, meet a challenge or fill a gap. You want to avoid the former.

An obvious feature about conferences is the expo section where vendors pitch their wares and many are tech outfits promoting the latest shiny thing. By all means pop your business card in the bowl and win that champagne but know your needs before you go shopping.

Mentoring is a great idea and doesn’t need technology but can technology help? I saw an app where mentors and mentees can connect without any need for human mediation. It’s a lot like Tinder (but not too much like Tinder).

 

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About Terry Williams - The Brain-Based Boss

I'm all about engaging people and helping you engage yours to influence behaviour to improve results - at work and at home. Maybe you're a manager, a salesperson, a leader, a parent, a presenter or an event organiser? You need to grab your people's attention, create some rapport, be memorable and influence behaviour change. How can we do that? I'm originally a trainer by trade, turned manager, turned comedian and partway back again. Author of 'THE GUIDE: How to kiss, get a job & other stuff you need to know', I write and speak about how to engage people, be they employees, family or yourself. How can we connect with people’s own internal motivations and help them use their own inner passions to drive towards productivity, success and happiness? And hopefully have a few laughs along the way... As a trainer facilitating learning and development in others, I find myself drawing on my own extensive business experience. I specialise in the delivery of high impact, customised training solutions for organisations that are serious about improving the performance and lives of their people.

Posted on June 15, 2017, in Employee Engagement and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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